Reef Shoes: Can you afford not to take them?

Reef shoes - a must for your next holiday! Reef shoes to protect your feet when snorkelling, fishing, swimming or climbing over rocks

The best thing you can buy if you are going on a holiday to the Great Barrier Reef or on a cruise holiday or any other kind of diving, fishing or summer holiday, is to get yourself a pair of reef shoes. In fact grab a pair for the whole family, it will be worth every cent.

The great thing about reef shoes is that they are not just for the summer season. 

They do a mighty fine job when they are used in the winter for any rocky areas, fishing or just walking along the beach (unfortunately we still get glass and rubbish on our beaches around the world)

A nasty coral cut, a sting from some unsuspecting sea creature or just hopping across burning hot sand can really dampen your well deserved holiday break so be sure you remember this gem of an item that can fit snugly into your suitcase or even your carry on bag.

The kids will love them and will never want to take them off, they can even wear them in the pool or when walking around the pool which will also prevent them slipping over and reef shoes will stop any sunburn to the feet, an area we can often forget to cover with sunscreen. Protecting your little one’s feet gives you peace of mind when they are running around on the beach or climbing over slippery rocks.

If you are going away in the winter months it can be difficult to find reef shoes in any of the shops. They don’t seem to sell them on P&O ships and it’s not worth buying cheap ones if you plan to use them in the future. (think of your next local trip to the beach or local holiday, the ones we don’t always count!) You will find you will wear reef shoes a lot more than you think you will.

Reef shoes are soft, comfortable, inexpensive and really do the job they were intended to do. How many times have you avoided stepping into the river or the sea because you couldn’t see the bottom or you didn’t want to step on the seaweed? I for one wouldn’t go on holiday without them.

We love to help people make their choice whether it's the size, colour or how many can fit into a postage bag. We get back to you with any queries within a very short space of time, we offer exceptional service, that means excellent communication, fast postage and help by email – julie@sunprotectionoz.com.au – or over the phone 7 days a week.

One other great bonus is that our reef shoes have a removable inner sole which means they can be washed and dried easily with no lingering damp odour so not only will they be ready to go the next day, but they will be ready to use for years to come. They also come in a handy, easy to carry drawstring mesh bag.

So no more need to search the shops high and low when you can purchase reef shoes from our store along with all of our other sun safe swim wear.

Things that sting or bite that you will definitely need to avoid:

Crown of Thorns: These interesting sea stars eat coral, and at times hit populations that can damage a coral reef. They are covered with long venomous spines, and with the way they look it should be easy to follow your instincts and avoid touching them or stepping on them.

crown-of-thorns

Sea Urchins: Many of the species here have shape spines, and we have read of species that can also inject a toxin. As with all reef life, avoid touching them or stepping on them.

sea urchin

sea urchin

Fire Corals: Avoid touching or stepping on these branched corals, as they can inflict a very painful sting.

fire coral

fire coral

Stinging Hydroids: If you follow the don’t touch rule you will avoid contacting these interesting organisms, which also can inflict a very painful sting.

stinging hydroid

stinging hydroid

Stinging Jellyfish: There are several species of jellyfish whose sting could be life threatening. The nets you see along the beaches during the summer months are to protect swimmers from one kind that is found along the coast. Out on the reef there is a species or set of species whose sting/venom can cause what is called Irukanji Syndrome, which can be life threatening. During times when risk of encountering these very small jellyfish is higher your dive operator may recommend you wear a lycra “stinger suit” which drastically reduces your risk of being stung. Always follow (or exceed) the advice of the dive staff regarding these jellyfish.

stinging jellyfish

stinging jellyfish

Anemones are closely related to jellyfish and corals, and like them are armed with tiny stinging cells. Thankfully most anemones are harmless, but some can deliver a painful sting. Avoid touching and stepping on them.

sea anenome

sea anenome

Stinging Fish: Lionfish, Stonefish, and certain other reef fish have spines in their fins that contain venom and can puncture you and inject the venom. Some of these fish are very well camouflaged, so avoid touching the reef, and use care when touching the bottom, and don’t annoy lionfish when you encounter them swimming.

lion fish

lion fish

Cone Shells: Cone shells are predatory snails, and kill their prey (usually fish) by shooting a toxin-loaded dart into them. Their handsome cone-shaped shells are very easy to spot, and under no circumstances should you pick up such a shell; a seemingly empty shell may just have the animal inside it.

cone shell

cone shell

Thanks for reading this post and we hope it helps you to consider purchasing them for your next fabulous holiday.

Don’t get caught out without your reef shoes!!!

Best Wishes from Sun Protection Oz

 


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